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Caregiving Resources

Planning to Remain at Home

Many people would prefer to stay living independently at home as long as possible. There can be many advantages to living close to friends, in a familiar neighborhood, in a home that you know well. 

Often, though, the key to being able to do this is to plan ahead and to consider "what if?" questions with your caregiving team. It can be very useful to use the planning resources, assessments and safety checklists with another person's help. These resources share planning advice:

 

One of the many reasons why people want to grow old at home is to remain close to family and friends - but what if you do not have family available to help care? With planning, friends might take on some of those roles:

 

Besides planning for a safe and comfortable home, think about options for travellng to the places you want to go - shopping, visiting, appointments, and the other "activities of daily life". If today you drive to those places, think ahead to when driving is no longer safe, and explore public transit or paratransit options in advance of when you really must depend on them. (The RYDE Frequently asked Questions are available in Chinese, Korean, Russian and Hindi as well as in English.)

Assess your Home Environment

A home safety assessment can be focused on specific concerns  or more wide-ranging. These sources can give an idea of what to look for. As described in the first source below, advice and assistance may be available from community organizations.

 

These checklists can help you identify possible problem areas (tip: print and check off items as you walk through the home).

A light-hearted, easy way to begin thinking about home safety is this online game on preventing a fall at home:

 

The materials available from StopFalls.org include home safety checklists in Spanish, Chinese, and Korean (see under the heading "Resources for Consumers") :

 

If someone in the home has memory loss or problems with attention, these checklists include safety tips to address those concerns too:

Technology Tools for Aging in Place

Many of the organizational tools listed under Caregiving Basics are relevant for aging at home, and some - like easy-access emergency contacts, medical alerts, medication reminders or electronic access to medical records - may be essential.  

Other apps or products are designed specifically for home use, like these medical alert apps, comparisons of medical alert devices, and  standalone alert mobile phone apps.

Disclaimer

​Be sure to discuss information gathered from these resources with your health care providers to see if it is relevant to your individual situation. Health and medical information accessed through these websites is not intended to substitute for or to replace the advice or instruction of a health care professional. 

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